The Reader 70

Have you been enjoying our latest issue of The Reader? If not, why ever not? Look at all the fantastic new writing and thought pieces we’ve got in store for you!

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The Reader 58 has arrived

Issue 58 of The Reader features Bill Bailey, Anna Woodford, Sarah Helm, Matthew Hollis, Salley Vickers and many more
Issue 58 of The Reader features Bill Bailey, Anna Woodford, Sarah Helm, Matthew Hollis, Salley Vickers and many more

If the heat is making you yearn to sit in the shade with some new reading material, then you’re in luck as Issue 58 of The Reader has arrived and it’s packed full of literary goodness to help you while away the long hot hours.

The contemporary very firmly combines with the classic this issue – new poetry comes from Matthew Hollis, Robert Etty, Claire Allen and Julian Flanagan with new fiction – the thought-provoking One, Two, Three, Four – from Greg Forshaw. To accompany the ever-popular Old Poem feature by Brian Nellist, we’re now introducing The Old Story to bring back a forgotten gem from the past, the first coming from Katherine Mansfield.

Bill Bailey talks to Fiona Magee about his own unique brand of comedy and why he’s not a fan of jokes, his relationship with language, ambitions to write a book and his belief in the importance of reading out loud.

“That’s the great power of literature: not all the information is there – you have to bring something as well to it to make it” – Bill Bailey

A trio of formidable female writers share their work: in this issue’s The Poet on Her Work, Anna Woodford discusses her poem ‘The Gender and Law at Durham Research Group’, looking at how two specialised languages – that of poetry and of law – respond to personal loss and the threatened loss of self. Salley Vickers‘ essay on The Winter’s Tale also examines loss – in particular the slow story of possible restoration after it – and extracts feature from Sarah Helm‘s If This Is A Woman, a scholarly and at the same time unswerving history of Ravensbruck, Hitler’s concentration camp for women.

All this, as well as a preview of the Storybarn, Liverpool’s new interactive story centre for children and families, by Jane Davis; tales from the Versewagon by Ian McMillan; five featured books about sisters from Angela MacMillan, and much more.

“Literature still serves all the purposes that oral storytelling once achieved, and remains essential to our wellbeing” – Joseph Gold, The Story Species

Make sure you order your copy now in time for your summer getaway – Issue 58 is available to order online now, via single copy or annual subscription, saving you 15% on the cover price over the year.

Visit our website for full details on purchasing: http://www.thereader.org.uk/magazine

 

The Reader 57

Issue 57 of The Reader arrives at The Reader HQ - ready for post out next week!
Issue 57 of The Reader arrives at The Reader HQ – ready for post out next week!

We might still be waiting for the temperatures to rise, but something guaranteed to put some warmth into Spring is the latest issue of The Reader.

Amongst the green leaves are two new short stories by Connie Bensley and Tim Parks, the latter of which is an account of the last days of the mysterious ‘Mrs P’:

“From being someone with time on her hands, happy to get company when she could, Mrs. P has become someone it is rather difficult to get hold of, a person you need to make an appointment with.” – Mrs P, Tim Parks

There’s poetry by the plenty with new work from Greg Moglia, Howard Wright, Chris Allen, Martin Malone and Marjorie Lofti Gill, Imtiaz Dharker writes on ‘Over The Moon’ from her collection Undone in the Poet on Her Work and we go back to the 17th century for Brian Nellist’s latest selection of The Old Poem.

Acclaimed film and television director Ken Loach speaks to Fiona McGee about his long standing relationship with writers and writing, tracing the connection into film and his own work, highlighting the importance of substance over visual style:

“The only thing that I’ve ever looked for is somebody who could write real people. If you read a page and the characters live and the dialogue sounds true then you’re looking at the work of a writer.” – Ken Loach

Two illuminating essays, considerable different in topic, come from author Salley Vickers and pioneering biologist Rupert Sheldrake, who write on instinct and sacrifice and psychic pets respectively.

There’s lots more to look forward to, including Ian McMillan on Ted Hughes and Five Wild Encounters recommended by Sarah Coley.

Issue 57 will be landing on doorsteps throughout the country and on The Reader Organisation’s website very soon, but in the meantime if you haven’t already got your subscription to The Reader now is the perfect time to do so. A year’s subscription gives you four issues worth, costing £24 in the UK and £36 international.

For full details on subscribing, visit the website: http://www.thereader.org.uk/magazine

 

Lent Lecture: Salley Vickers

salley_vickersLiverpool Parish Church Lent Talks: Salley Vickers (sponsored by The Reader Organisation)
Thursday 19th March, 6pm
Our Lady and Saint Nicholas Church, Chapel Street, Liverpool L2 8TZ

FREE ENTRY

As part of this year’s Lent Talks at Liverpool Parish Church, author Salley Vickers will be appearing at this special event on Thursday 19th March.

Described as “a novelist in the great English tradition of moral seriousness” by the Washington Post, Salley has been one of the biggest names in modern English Literature since the publication of her first novel Miss Garnet’s Angel in 2000, which was described as a ‘word-of-mouth bestseller’. Her novels show an acute awareness of human nature and invite us to side with the onlooker who becomes involved in the story. Her latest collection of short stories, The Boy Who Could See Death, will be published in April.

Salley has also been a regular contributor to The Reader magazine, in Issue 39 with Epiphany, her short story on the topic of mortality, Issue 54 with an essay on ‘Why Poetry Matters’ and Issue 55.

Now residing in London, Salley returns to her birth city of Liverpool for what promises to be an insightful and inspiring talk in a historic series, sponsored by The Reader Organisation.

This year’s Lent Talks take on a new format: speakers talk for 45 minutes (most will also look for questions and contributions from the audience), with audience members invited to stay for refreshments for 45 minutes afterwards to meet the speaker and each other.

Because the talks are a gift to the City, there is no charge and no need to book. You may have to come early to guarantee a good seat but everyone is welcome.

Back issues of The Reader 39, 54 and 55, in which Salley is featured, will also be available for free on the night.

For further information, see the Diocese of Liverpool website.