AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Award

The School of English at the University of Liverpool, in partnership with The Reader Organisation has been awarded an AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Award. This project will explore the existing theoretical foundations for the practice of bibliotherapy, or reading as cure, in the English literary tradition and seek to translate theory into practice by using methods and materials suggested by the research base in shared reading groups in mental health contexts provided by Mersey Care NHS Trust.

The partnership with Mersey Care NHS Trust, which serves a population of one million across Merseyside, builds on a successful record of association with The Reader Organisation, which is now a nationally recognised centre for the promotion of reading as an intervention in mental health.

This PhD is likely to be the first if its kind to seek to reclaim English Literature as pivotal in relation to health and well-being, and, through a mix of practical and theoretical methods, to give the existing language of English Literature an equal place alongside social and biomedical sciences in the observation and analysis of human experience.

For more information on the PhD project and how to apply, please visit our website, or you can email Dr Josie Billington.

STOP THE TRAFFIK

STOP THE TRAFFIK is a global activist movement campaigning to end the forcing of innocent people into slavery, sweat shops, sexual exploitation, or any other form of abuse.

Steve Chalke, Chair of STOP THE TRAFFIK and UN. GIFT Special Advisor on Community Action Against Human Traffiking, has composed STOP THE TRAFFIK: People Shouldn’t be Bought & Sold, a book which outlines the very real forms of exploitation that are alive in the world today. He argues that traffiking is not only a global issue but also a problem within local communities, and should be dealt with as such. Included are the personal accounts of those who have been tricked or forced into some type of illegal activity, and factual and background information on trafficking is provided to explain exactly what trafficking is, and what can be done to stop it. The book also includes a chapter written by Cherie Blair, human rights lawyer and campaigner for women’s rights.

STOP THE TRAFFIK: People Shouldn’t Be Bought & Sold is available now.

Thinkers About Community

Can anyone help with this?

I want to read a book of thinking about ‘community’.

I mean, by those inverted commas, something like a particular take on community: how people can be together, or why they do, or why it is in our DNA (is it?) and why the word has so much in the way of  religous overtones… and is ‘community’ always  semi-religous? I’d like it to be a thought-book rather than fiction… but I’m not very good at reading heavy duty philosophy.

I’d be happy if it was old… if it was great… but I’ll take what you got.  Reading lists please.

Reading in Practice Student Conference

Friday 6th February 2009, 2.00 – 5.00pm, Room 1.15, 126 Mount Pleasant, Liverpool

In 2008 the School of English at the University of Liverpool, in collaboration with The Reader Organisation, was awarded funding by the English Subject Centre to deliver a ‘Reading in Practice’ project. The project places undergraduates as reading-group leaders in the Merseyside community, as part of the Get into Reading project. So far, the ‘Reading in Practice’ project has placed students in Get Into Reading groups in settings as diverse as homeless hostels, dementia care homes, mental health day centres and drug rehabilitation units.

We’re looking for new recruits – vibrant, thinking individuals who care about books to take part in this flourishing project – to build on the success of the student volunteer project and take it forward into 2009. This is a wonderful opportunity for students wishing to extend their minds, their reading, their usefulness to the community and the ‘work-related experience’ sections of their CV. Come and hear about it from students who are already devotees!

Click here to view the Reading in Practice Student Conference programme.

The conference is likely to appeal most to first or second year students of English or related subjects (Classics, Irish Literature, Latin American Studies, Modern Languages); it may also appeal to medical students interested in reading and health. To guarantee a place at the conference, or for further information, please contact Dr Josie Billington.