27 Links: Links from Reader 27 on Victoria Field

In issue 27, The Reader tries to be happy, gathering together stories, poetry, essays and recommendations that focus on moments of joy and simple pleasure. It includes an article by Victoria Field, a writer and poetry therapist from Cornwall, in which she looks at the development of her own reading life and the books she loves. We thought we’d pull together some things from the Web to add to your enjoyment of the piece. Issue 27 of The Reader magazine is available now. To find out more and to get your hands on a copy, click here

Victoria writes about her reading life, from childhood, right through to recommendations from her present-day reading. If, like Victoria you were a fan of Enid Blyton’s ‘Malory Towers’ books as a child, you will enjoy a visit to Enid Blyton.net, where you can reminisce and find out what became of the Malory Towers girls after school. Whilst studying at grammar school, it was Al Alvarez’s The New Poetry, published by penguin that captured her imagination, a book which Victoria says ‘was destined to follow me for the rest of my life’. To read a review of the book click here

Victoria’s work in Poetry Therapy uses poetry to promote health and well being. You can read more about the work being done on a large scale in this area on the websites belonging to the two organisations Victoria highlights in her piece, The U.S. National Association for Poetry Therapy and in the U.K. LAPIDUS

Victoria’s own interest in this area was helped along by Professor Stuart Sutherland, who headed the Experimental Psychology department at Sussex University and told his students repeatedly that ‘literature, not psychology, held the key to human nature.’ You can read reviews of his memoir of his own manic depressive illness here. And if you are interested in learning more about the world of poetry therapy, you might find Victoria’s book, ‘Writing Works – A Handbook of Therapeutic Writing Workshops and Activities’ a useful resource. Click here to read more about the book.

Read more in The Reader magazine.

By Katie Peters

Poppy Shakespeare Giveaway

Back in July we highlighted Poppy Shakespeare by Clare Allan as one of our ‘recommended reads‘ (To read the recommendation click here) Publishers Bloomsbury have been good enough to offer us three copies of the book to give away free to the first three people to take out a year’s subscription to The Reader magazine. Simply click here to register for a one year subscription and if you are one of the first three people to subscribe, not only will you receive four issues of the new look Reader magazine, packed with recommendations, reviews, poetry and fiction, you will also get a lovely copy of Poppy Shakespeare sent straight to your door. Thank you Bloomsbury!

Read more of our Recommended Reads here.

The Reader 27 has landed!

In Issue 27, The Reader tries for happiness and we couldn’t be more happy that it has arrived so we can share its delights with our subscribers! The collection of stories, poetry, essays and recommendations in this issue focus on moments of joy and simple pleasure, moments that we should try to capture and remember how important they are to our lives.

This is also the first issue of The Reader with Phil Davis as editor, taking over the helm of the magazine from his wife and colleague Jane Davis. It is an exciting time in The Reader office, lots of changes are afoot – a new design for the magazine, extensions of The Reader‘s outreach projects – yet the magazine’s heart and soul remains concerned with the human content to be found in literature. That will not change. You can read Phil’s editorial here.

Highlights in this issue include poetry by Omar Sabbagh, a young new poet we’re thrilled about publishing, reading his poems makes you aware of the solidity and lightness of life. There is also poetry by Tom Paulin, R. S. Thomas, Martin Malone, Sean Elliott and Andrew Shields. Bernard Beatty writes an animated essay on ‘Ecstatic Moments’ and Josie Billington focuses on the late love of the Barrett Brownings. David Constantine and Jo Canon provide us with some great short stories in which the chance of happiness in glitteringly present and real but is often transient. You can read more about this very full issue on The Reader‘s website.

To subscribe to the magazine and read it all for yourself, click here.

Posted by Jen Tomkins

Cheltenham Literature Festival 2007

The Reader is going to this year’s Cheltenham Literature Festival to bring you news from the festival direct to this blog. The focus of this year’s festival is ‘What does change mean to us?’ and there will be reports on the dynamic debates, critical conversations and inspiring ideas that the festival guests have to offer. The festival is up on our calendar and I’ll add specific events as tickets are confirmed. Hopefully I’ll be able to interview some of the speakers formally (although I look forward with great anticipation to ‘bumping’ into them more informally), to get a unique insight into their experiences of the festival and ask how important books and reading are to their lives. I’ll be jumping at every opportunity to ask the literary folk in Cheltenham for their book recommendations, top tips on who to keep an eye on and will report it all back via The Reader Online. The best way to get updates is to subscribe our RSS feed.

By Jen Tomkins

Ian MacMillan–New Reader Regular

Philip Davis, editor of The Reader writes to say that Ian MacMillan, poet, performer and broadcaster is to become a regular contributor to the magazine, starting with the Christmas 2007 edition. Ian MacMillan, who has been described by the TES as “the Shirley Bassey of performance poetry”, presents The Verb on BBC Radio 3 and has recently been appointed Poet in Space by the Yorkshire Planetarium. We’re pleased to be on his trajectory.

Issue 26 of The Reader magazine out now

Issue 26 highlights include:

• New poetry by Connie Bensley, Angela Leighton, Howard Wright, Mark Leech, Mike Hoy, Nicola Daly and Carrie Etter; plus the continuation of our innovative new poetry feature, ‘The Poet on his Work’ (or her Work) in which poets give us a rare glimpse of the complex skeins of thought and words underneath the neatly woven surface of a finished poem. Neil Curry writes on his poem ‘Among the Ruins’ and you can read his piece online now.

• Fiction by Roy Kesey

Michael Symmons Roberts, ‘An Accidental Career’, an insight into the life of a librettist.

• Adam Piette answers a reader’s question on a poem by George Herbert

• The conclusion of Phil Davis’s conversation with Jonathan Bate about Shakespeare at the RSC

• A short interview with Edward Hardwicke who played Dr Watson opposite Jeremy Brett’s Sherlock Holmes in the outstanding Granada TV adaptation of the Conan Doyle books.

• Readers Connect looks at Shirley , one of Charlotte Brontë’s lesser-known novels

• Plus recommendations of Peter Taylor, Susanna Clarke, Antony and Cleopatra and Raymond Chandler and all our usual features.

To subscribe or order your copy today, click here